Iran Daily: Tehran Promises “Special Surprise” If US Leaves Nuclear Deal

Iran’s officials have promised a “special surprise” if the Trump Administration withdraws from the July 2015 nuclear agreement between Tehran and the 5+1 Powers.

Ali Akbar Salehi (pictured), the head of the Atomic Energy Organization, put out the message:

The enemies should know that in case of a JCPOA [Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action] rollback — even though we are never looking for such a situation — special conditions will arise, and when the high ranking officials decide, there will be a special surprise for those who scuttle the agreement.

Salehi did not specify the “surprise”, but analysts believe Iran will soon resume enrichment of 20% uranium and pursue more powerful and efficient nuclear centrifuges.

Under the deal, Iran agreed to halt production of 20% uranium — which potentially can be further enriched to military-grade 95% uranium — and to send all stocks abroad. Tehran also suspended its plans for research and development of centrifuges which could yield the enriched uranium far more quickly.

While imposing new sanctions on Iran, the Trump Administration has so far held off on withdrawal from the agreement. However, Donald Trump — who has repeatedly denounced the “worst deal ever” — may refuse to extend a waiver on broader, Congressionally-mandated sanctions in mid-May, effectively scuttling the JCPOA.

Iran has courted the European signatories of the deal — the UK, France, and Germany — to maintain the accord and to distance themselves from the US if Trump does not sign the waiver by a May 12 deadline.

The Chairman of Parliament’s National Security Committee, Alaeddin Boroujerdi, extended Salehi’s warning on Saturday, saying, “If…sanctions are re-imposed on Iran, we definitely will not remain in the JCPOA.”

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Scott Lucas is Professor of International Politics at the University of Birmingham and editor-in-chief of EA WorldView. He is a specialist in US and British foreign policy and international relations, especially the Middle East and Iran. Formerly he worked as a journalist in the US, writing for newspapers including the Guardian and The Independent and was an essayist for The New Statesman before he founded EA WorldView in November 2008.

7 COMMENTS

  1. “Tehran also suspended its plans for research and development of centrifuges which could yield the enriched uranium far more quickly.”

    Not so:

    “Iran will continue testing of the IR-6 on single centrifuge machines and its intermediate cascades and will commence testing of up to 30 centrifuge machines from one and a half years before the end of year 10. Iran will proceed from single centrifuge machines and small cascades to intermediate cascades in a logical sequence. Iran will commence, upon start of implementation of the JCPOA, testing of the IR-8 on single centrifuge machines and its intermediate cascades and will commence the testing of up to 30 centrifuges machines from one and a half years before the end of year 10. Iran will proceed from single centrifuges to small cascades to intermediate cascades in a logical sequence.”

    The fact that Iran is permitted under the deal to continue (limited) R&D work on the IR-6 and IR-8 centrifuges for 10 years has caused great concern among those skeptical of the agreement.

    • You’ll notice the phrase “suspended its plans”. Iran has planned for far more extensive R&D than that permitted under JCPOA.

      • The Iranians have **curbed/limited** their R&D activities regarding advanced centrifuges for 10 years. They have, however, suspended R&D in laser enrichment for 10 years and plutonium reprocessing for 15 years.

        They also took down two cascades of IR2m and IR4 centrifuges at the Pilot Enrichment Plant in Natanz.

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