TrumpWatch, Day 248: An Indefinite “Muslim Ban”

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Protesters against the original "Muslim Ban" by the Trump Administration (AP)

Trump: “We will not admit those into our country we cannot safely vet”


Developments on Day 248 of the Trump Administration:

Trump Bans Entry from 6 Mainly-Muslim Countries and North Korea

Eight months after its initial attempt to block entry to the US by citizens of seven mainly-Muslim countries, the Trump Administration defies court objections and imposes an indefinite ban.

Donald Trump issued the order on Sunday, claiming — without support — threats to national security. It takes effect from October 18.

The new order is more far-reaching than the January executive order, which was soon suspended by courts, and a revised March executive order which has also been limited by legal challenges. It establishes permanent restrictions on travel, rather than the original 90-day suspension.

Five of the seven countries named on Sunday — Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, and Somalia — were also in January’s order. They are joined by Chad and North Korea.

Citizens of Iraq, named in January but removed in March’s revision, will face restrictions or heightened scrutiny as will some people from Venezuela.

Sudan, in both the January and March orders, has been removed entirely.

Trump’s latest order may pre-empt the Supreme Court was due in early October to consider the legality of March’s revision. The court issued an interim ruling in July that said those with “bona fide relationships” to individuals, companies, or educational institutions in the US could continue to enter.

Officials said there will be exceptions to a blanket ban: Iran will still be able to send its citizens on student exchanges, though they will be subject to enhanced screening, and Somalis may visit with extra scrutiny.

But the officials said that in most cases citizens of the seven countries will be unable to emigrate to the US permanently and most will be barred from coming to work, study or vacation.

Administration officials said the new rules will not apply to legal permanent residents of the United States, and that visitors who currently hold valid visas will not face revocation. Students already in the US can finish their studies and employees of businesses may stay for as long as existing visas remain valid.

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1 COMMENT

  1. For Dotard the Blowhard this is “fire and fury, like the world has never seen”

    Powerless to make good on his infantile impulses to start tossing nukes, he is reduced to throwing these little EO tantrums.

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