Syria Daily, July 5: Regime Takes Key Industrial Area East of Aleppo

Scott Lucas
By Scott Lucas July 5, 2014 06:38 Updated

Syria Daily, July 5: Regime Takes Key Industrial Area East of Aleppo

Story Highlights

  • State TV broadcasts from inside Sheikh Najjar
  • Syrian military tried for months to take area
  • Capture supports regime plan of siege of east Aleppo

Related Articles

LATEST: Pictures — Islamic State Takes Shuhail and Oilfields in East

The Syrian military, backed by video, claimed the capture of the Sheikh Najjar industrial area east of Aleppo on Friday.

A State TV broadcast with a correspondent in Sheikh Najjar:

The Assad regime has been trying for months to claim the area and its factories. The military has moved into sections on previous occasions, only to be pushed out by insurgent resistance.

This week the takeover came suddenly, with Syrian forces claiming parts of Sheikh Najjar on Thursday and then — apparently because of insurgent withdrawal — completing the occupation yesterday.

The advance furthers the military’s plan of cutting off and besieging insurgents in eastern Aleppo. Syria’s largest city has been divided since July 2012.

The Governor of Aleppo Province, Mohammad Wahid Aqqad toured parts of Sheikh Najjar on Friday, proclaiming that an operations room would ensure the return of industrialists and resumption of production.


Pictures: Islamic State Takes Shuhail and Oilfields in East

Continuing its advance in Deir Ez Zor Province, the Islamic State has taken Shuhail and nearby oilfields, as insurgents withdraw from the area:

ISIS SHOHAIL 1

ISIS SHOHAIL 3

ISIS SHOHAIL 2

Islamic State Attacking Kurdish Area of Kobane in Northeast

After a series of victories against insurgents in eastern Syria, the Islamic State attacked the Kurdish-held town of Kobane on Friday.

Pro-Islamic State accounts on social media claimed the capture of four villages in the advance on the town, while pro-Kurdish media said the attack had been repelled.

The commander of the Kurdish militia YPG and Kurdish activists asserted that 85 members of the Islamic State have been killed since Sunday.

Scott Lucas
By Scott Lucas July 5, 2014 06:38 Updated
Write a comment

6 Comments

  1. Razmjoo July 5, 14:12

    No doubt the militants looted the factories of their equipment. And these people call themselves “freedom fighters”.

    Reply to this comment
  2. Genome45 July 5, 13:21

    The SAA and the NDF have already taken villages north to the industrial city, notably, Tall Shair, very close to the infantry school, the main rebel HQ for north Aleppo.

    That’s the next big target. Rebels seems very nervous about the possibility of losing the Infantry school.

    Reply to this comment
    • caligola July 5, 14:38

      There are rumours that nusra and others might decide to abbandon aleppo. Anyways you turn it Aleppo will go down fast. Rebels better make preparations to bail out if not they risk to be trapped and suffer huge casualties.

      Reply to this comment
      • RedTornadoes July 5, 18:50

        ANALYSIS: Can the Fall of Deir Ezzor and Aleppo to ISIS Have an Upside?

        The Syrian Army is highly incompetent.. Two so-called “regime”victories” were actually ISIS victories. That means ISIS now can call the shots in both cities, exercising full dominion if desired. No one can dispute that, using rebel boots on the ground and US air power, Obama could easily have thwarted ISIS in both situation. (See my analaysis at Enduring America yesterday on how Obama appears to be either an Iranian mole or the Biggest Sucker Ever Born).

        For the rebels losing Aleppo and Deir Ezzo will sting but could turn out to be advantageous in a mlitiary sense while the political blowback on Obama could produce good things. In retrospect rebels have spent too much time and resources on Aleppo and Deir Ezzo even they were winning. The regime not care if ISIS owns Deir Ezzor so long as it can continue to buy oil whose reventues finance the war against Maliki in Iraq as well but Iran should be having second thoughts about continuing to back collusion between Assad and ISIS. In Aleppo, ISIS can force the regime to eat humble pie.

        Unlike the regime, rebels no longer have to spend time and manpower on ISIS but the regime must retain forces there. To preserve the alliance, Assad and ISIS may have to agree to a humlating Raqaa-like arrangement similar to that in Raqaa where the 17th Division is tolerated but everyone knows who is boss. For mliitary and political reasons (the presence of many Shia loyalist communities), the regime will have no choice but to keep most present forces in Aleppo, aware of how ISIS is likely to take advantage otherwise. under which ISIS actually owns the place while the regime pretends otherwise and a regime presence is tolerated. By contrast, most rebel forces have slipped away as they did in Qalamoun, Quyar and Homs rebels. You can’t defeat an insurrection by seizing places on a map. You must defeat, crush and annihilate the rebel army. Assad has shown no ability to do so. Thus the war will continue. Not only do rebels have more forces available elsewhere–even with Obama-insipired defections to ISIS–but twitters have been full of calls for a national army. Meanwhile ISIS is likely to employ some of those defectors against Al-Maliki now and the regime later.

        Having got all of the east from Aleppo to Deir Ezzor, how long will ISIS continue its present alliance of convenience with Assad? Since it has little interest–for now–on the rest of Syria, it could turn on Assad now. More likely it will work out Raqaa-style arranagements in the east while copying Obama’s policy of enouraging stalemate elsewhere in Syria. in that case we can expect ISIS to help Assad in places like East Ghouta and Hama but that effort would stop if a regime victory seems anywhere near. Meanwhile Obama’s wet-dream fantasy in which moderate rebels would ally themselves with an ugly, murderous crowd consisting of the Genocide Regime, the Iran Alliance for Shia Rule, Vladimir Putin and the Great Backstabber who currently rules the USA has no chance.

        What will shake the USA politically is that ISIS is likely to move the capital of its proclaimed Islamic caliphate from Raqaa to That will bring intense scrutiny to Obama’s collusion in both victories and to earlier disasterous decisions going back to 2011. Congress and the American public cannot continue to tolerate what looks like outright White House collusion with Assad, Iran and (in Syria’s case) with ISIS. The pressure to aid the rebels will mount.

        Behind the scenes, many Democrats express fear of repercussions as mid-term elections near. The big topic enabled by Obama’s role in handing over Aleppo and Deir Ezzor to ISIS will be equivalent to those “Who lost China?” arguments after 1949. Truman, however, was falsely accused. Losing China was inevitabel in retrospect. Much of what happened in Syria and elsewhere was avoidable had the president acted differently. Nor can Obama claim advisors like Hillary and Petraeus didn’t warn him

        Most of the anti-Obama attacks will be justified but some will be partisan just as Republicans determined to roll back the New Deal using the threat of communism, attacked Harry Truman and promoted McCarthyism. History has vindicated Truman but willl not vindicate Obama. Truman is now regarded as one of the greatest presidents–a man who backed the Marshall Plan, NATO, George Kennan’s containment policies and the very unObama-llike Truman Doctrine whiich prevented Stalin from seizing Turkey and Greece using the same cheap victory methods Putin now employs in the Ukraine. Truman responded with strong backing for those fighting Stalin’s proxies.

        Historically Obama’s reputation will be closer to that of Dadalier and Chamberlain at Munich than Truman’s. Just as Munich woke up the Brits who has been kidding themselves, Aleppo, Deir Ezzor and the declaration of a new caliphate capital in Aleppo are likely to upset most Americans. The more hostile scrutiny directed at Obama, the harder it will be for him to continue his planned collaboration with Assad and his security organs, with iran and (Iin Syria at least–with ISIS). What also will become even harder to sell is any attempt to bring American into a VIet Nam-style quagmire to save the butts of Iran and al-Maliki whose support for anti-Sunni crimes started all this. Let them do it. If we get involvd in trying to save Iran’s puppet regime in Iraq–the one for which it killed so many Americans–we’ll be sucked into a situation far worse than a decade ago.

        Reply to this comment
        • Genome45 July 5, 22:06

          There are no ISIS inside Aleppo city, that’s one of the few place where other rebels got the upper hand over ISIS.

          The Syrian Army has become highly competent and effective, since September last year, where hey blasted through rebels and ISIS to break the siege of Aleppo.

          Since then, they have been taking grounds froms rebels, from Nusra and from ISIS around east Aleppo.

          Reply to this comment
          • ronnybekkers July 6, 17:54

            “Highly competent and effetive”… take a few miles of countryside on the edge of aleppo and an industrial area, and all that took nearly one whole year??!! So at this rate the Syrian government will have a total victory by about 2114…nice…

            Reply to this comment
View comments

Write a comment

Leave a Comment

EA’s Advertisers

Tavaana_banner

Donate To EA

Enter your email address to subscribe to EA and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow EAWorldView


Subscribe to me on YouTube

Archive