Iran Daily: Tehran Pushes Back IAEA — No Access to Military Sites

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The Supreme Leader’s top aide, Ali Akbar Velayati, has pushed back the claim of the International Atomic Energy Agency that it can inspect military sites under the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and the 5+1 Powers.

Velayati (pictured) responded sharply on Tuesday to a statement by IAEA Secretary-General Yukiya Amano, made the previous day, that the IAEA is not distinguishing between civilian and military sites in determining whether an inspection is necessary.

The Iranian official chided:

In the previous agreements with the agency (IAEA) there was no talk of access to military sites at all; and if it were so, we wouldn’t have come to an agreement….

Mr. Amano, his agents and no other foreigners have the right to inspect our military sites, because these sites are among off-limit sites for any foreigner and those affiliated with them.

Velayati insisted that Amano’s claim about the IAEA’s right to inspection is “his own fabrication”. He argued that Amano is not independent, saying that otherwise the Secretary-General would ask Israel to open its nuclear sites to inspection.

To date, the IAEA has not requested access to an Iranian military site, as there is no evidence indicating of a violation of the nuclear deal in those locations. The agency has repeatedly verified Iranian compliance with the deal.

But the US is pressing the IAEA to seek access, as part of the Trump Administration’s attempt to put more pressure on Iran. In late August, US ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley travelled to IAEA headquarters in Vienna to press Washington’s case.

See Podcast: A Trump Administration Showdown with Iran? (Not Yet.)
Iran Daily, September 12: Trump Administration Considers Tougher Regional Options v. Tehran

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8 COMMENTS

  1. “The IAEA has not requested access to an Iranian military site, as there is no evidence indicating of a violation of the nuclear deal in those locations.”

    How does that work? How can the IAEA be in a position to have any evidence indicating covert work if it is not permitted to inspect military sites where this may be taking place? That is an entirely circular argument to make.

      • In 2002, the NCRI-PMOI terrorist group revealed the locations of the Natanz and Arak facilities. Up and until then, there was no indication they existed. But, in any case, Iran has now ruled out military sites for inspection regardless of whether they are “indicators” or not.

        • Not sure what you are saying here. But, rest assured, there is a lot of information which has been collected about a military site like Parchin, from a range of technical, electronic, and human sources.

          • My point is that Iranian nuclear sites can go undetected for years and in the case of Natanz and Arak, and Lashkar-Abad (laser enrichment plant), western intel and the IAEA was totally unaware before the PMOI revealed their existence. However, Iranian military sites are unlikely to conceal as big as an enrichment plant or a reactor but could be where covert R&D and explosives testing takes place. Parchin was only “self-inspected” in 2015 which is, of course, ridiculous.

            • My point is that Iranian nuclear sites can go undetected for years and in the case of Natanz and Arak, and Lashkar-Abad (laser enrichment plant), western intel and the IAEA was totally unaware before the PMOI revealed their existence.

              That’s simply false. None of those sites were undetected. In fact, it turns out that many of PMOI’s claims were BS.
              http://foreignpolicy.com/2015/03/03/that-secret-iranian-nuclear-facility-you-just-found-not-so-much/

              Arak was water facility, which is not regarded as a nuclear facility, and there was never any laser enrichment plant to speak of. The allegation of Iran pursuing the path to laser enrichment was nothing more than accusations about feasibility study based on unverified documents from the smoking laptop that was never forensically examined for authenticity.


              However, Iranian military sites are unlikely to conceal as big as an enrichment plant or a reactor but could be where covert R&D and explosives testing takes place.

              That’s just the old absence of evidence canard.

              Parchin was only “self-inspected” in 2015 which is, of course, ridiculous.

              No it was not self inspected. Iranians took environmental samples which is standard practice. The IAEA were granted full access. You are also wrong anyway. IAEA inspectors visited the Parchin twice prior to 2009 and found nothing. It was only when Washington poodle, Amano, took over that Parchin became hyped.

        • The Natanz and Arak facilities where nowhere near complete or ready to be declared by Iran the IAEA. What’s more, Israel for the intel to the MEK front group.

          Iran has now ruled out military sites for inspection regardless of whether they are “indicators” or not.

          Patching was a military site and the IAEA was given access.

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