Syria Daily: ISIS Retakes Palmyra, Pro-Assad Forces Close to Capture of Aleppo

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PHOTO: An Islamic State fighter inside captured Palmyra on Sunday


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UPDATE 2145 GMT: A message from “Lina Shamy”, a resident of east Aleppo, “To everyone who can hear me, we are here exposed to a genocide”:


UPDATE 2115 GMT: Effectively confirming that Russia promote US-Russian discussions to buy time for military operations in eastern Aleppo, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has said that the talks are at a “dead end”.

Last weekend a US-Russian proposal was presented to the opposition for the withdrawal of rebels, families, and civilians; however, as pro-Assad forces renewed their advance, Moscow denied any agreement with Washington.

Lavrov said at a news conference in Belgrade:

From Dec. 3 when we met John Kerry in Rome they supported such a concept [of total rebel withdrawal and even gave us their approval on paper.

But after three days they revoked that agreement and returned to their old, dead-end position which comprises this: before the agreement on corridors there has to be a truce…As I understand, this would just mean the rebels would get a break.

The Foreign Minister also declared that the Islamic State’s capture of Palmyra may have been “orchestrated, coordinated” by the US-led coalition “to give a break to those bandits that are in eastern Aleppo”.


UPDATE 2020 GMT: The opposition is down to its last few districts in eastern Aleppo city, with the Syrian military saying victory will soon be declared.

Foreign forces and regime army and paramilitary units now control the Bustan al-Qasr area. Rebels are holding out in Sukkari, Mash’had, and Zebdia.


UPDATE 2000 GMT: Residents in the al-Firdous district have told Al Jazeera that pro-Assad forces summarily executed as many as 70 people over alleged connections to rebels.

Pro-opposition activists and outlets on social media are echoing the claim, citing mass killings in Kalaseh and Bustan al-Qasr.

One report, from a normally reliable activist, said all staff of one hospital have been executed:

However, a doctor at the hospital later said that all staff were alive: “One Gynecologist went to regime area. We’ve been under shelling [so] people thought we died.”


UPDATE 1710 GMT: Bilal Abdul Kareem of On the Ground News, who has been reporting from east Aleppo, sends a final message:


UPDATE 1445 GMT: On Sunday, Fateham al-Abed — the east Aleppo teacher whose tweets have vividly described life under siege, bombardment, and ground assault — spoke with CNN:

I am afraid to lose one of my kids if I flee with all the people because they think I work against the regime.

Today al-Abed, whose 7-year-daughter Bana has become an iconic face of the Aleppo story — says:

Later, the account posted in Bana’s name:


UPDATE 1245 GMT: France has reacted to Russia’s withdrawal of a US-Russian proposal for evacuation of eastern Aleppo city, accusing Moscow of “constant lies”.

French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault told reporters:

There is Russian doublespeak…a form of constant lies. On the one hand they say let’s negotiate, and we negotiate to reach a ceasefire.

On the other, they continue the war, a total war, it’s a desire to save the Assad regime and to make Aleppo fall.

Ayrault continued by challenging Russia’s pretext for its military operations: “The Russians who pretend to fight against terrorism are in fact focusing on Aleppo and have given space to Daesh [the Islamic State], which is in the process of taking back Palmyra, which is very symbolic.”


UPDATE 0715 GMT: The US-Russian proposal for a rebel-civilian departure from opposition-held areas of Aleppo appears to have been overtaken by important gains by pro-Assad forces.

The Syrian military is declaring control of the Sheikh Saeed district, which foreign allies and regime troops have been trying to take for weeks. The military also says it has taken Firdous and Karm al-Da’da.

A resident of East Aleppo tweets:

Claimed photo of Palestinian militiamen from Liwa al-Quds in Sheikh Sa’eed:

aleppo-assad-troops-12-12-16

Russia has now stepped back from the US-Russian document, under consideration by opposition officials and seen by Reuters, denying that it reached any agreement with Washington.

Bombing of the remaining opposition districts today:

Pro-Assad reporter Sohayb Masri and regime soldiers mock a captured rebel:

Hossein Mortada, a reporter for Iran’s al-Alam, laughs as he drives one of the green buses deployed to take away civilians leaving east Aleppo:


ORIGINAL ENTRY: Reversing more than a year of setbacks in Syria, the Islamic State has recaptured the historic city of Palmyra from the Assad regime.

Meanwhile, in besieged and bombarded Aleppo city, the opposition is considering a US-Russian proposal for the removal of rebels and civilians from its areas.

In only the third day of a lightning offensive, ISIS completed the takeover of Palmyra, famed for its Roman ruins, on Sunday. The group first captured the city in May 2015, but was pushed out by pro-Assad forces in March 2016. The loss came amid a series of defeats and retreats by the Islamic State across northern Syria, initially at the hands of a Kurdish-led push from the northeast and from August by a Turkish-rebel offensive moving south from the Syrian-Turkish border.

Taking advantage of the concentration of the Syrian military and its foreign allies on Aleppo, the Islamic State launched its attacks on Friday, quickly surrounding Palmyra from three sides. It entered the city on Saturday, prompting many defenders to flee, but withdrew briefly after an intense Russian and regime aerial assault.

Photographs on Sunday confirmed the ISIS success, with little apparent resistance from the remaining pro-Assad army and paramilitary units.

The Islamic State pressed its advance, taking the al-Dawa area to the west of the city. By Sunday night, it was reportedly on the outskirts of the T4 military airbase, one of the most important for the Assad regime and a staging point for Russian aerial operations.

ISIS fighters in the center of Palmyra:

ISIS fighters with captured and destroyed armors:

Equipment left to ISIS by regime forces, including 5 T-55 tanks, 3 T-72 tanks, and four other armored vehicles:

Opposition Considers Departure from Aleppo

The Assad regime and its foreign allies could be on the verge of reunited Aleppo, Syria’s largest city, for the first time since July 2012.

The opposition, which has lost at least 75% of its territory in eastern Aleppo, since November 26, is considered a US-Russian proposal for rebel, their families, and other civilians to leave.

In a small compromise, Russia is now permitting rebels to withdraw to areas other than opposition-held Idlib Province. Some could move to northern Aleppo Province, linking up with the Turkish-rebel offensive which is closing on the Islamic State’s last major position, the town of al-Bab to the northeast of Aleppo city.

“They sent us a letter, they are saying to safeguard the civilians … you can leave in an honorable way to any place you choose and the Russians will pledge publicly that nobody will be harmed or stopped,” said an opposition official. “We have yet to give a response.”

A second official said a plan “is being proposed to the factions, the fundamental thing in it is the departure of the all the fighters in an honorable way”.

Russia maintained a cautious position, asserting that it had not reached any agreement with the US but was working to “create the necessary conditions” for the removal of people.

Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said, “The issue of withdrawing militants is the subject of separate agreements. This agreement has not yet been reached, largely because the United States insists on unacceptable terms.”

He said talks between Russian and US specialists are continuing in Geneva,

Moscow’s stance may be trying to buy more time for a military conquest of the remaining opposition districts. On Monday morning, the Syrian military declared that it had finally taken the Sheikh Saeed district, after weeks of attacks, on the southern edge of the opposition pocket.


Claim: 85 Killed in Pro-Assad “Toxic Gas” Attack on Village in Eastern Hama

The pro-opposition Local Coordination Committees is reporting the killing of at least 85 people by a pro-Assad “toxic gas” attack on a village in eastern Hama Province.

The LCC said pro-Assad forces fired shells with sarin on Uqayribat. Other activists said mustard agent was used.

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49 COMMENTS

  1. Rebels must revise their strategy to put pressure on genocidal outside invaders like Russia, Iran, Hezbollah and Lebanese Shiites. When are the rebels going to wake up? Common sense says this: The way to force these powers to withdraw is by making the cost too high. You do that by bring to the
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    homelands of invading powers the same kind of brutality which they’ve brought to Syria and which they’ve supported on Assad’s part. That brutality, like Russia’s and Assad’s, must extend to supporting civilian and destruction of Russian infrastructure (pipelines, bridges, hospitals, schools). .Elements critical to the Russian economy must be destroyed along with Russian morale. Only when the cost is made high enough, will the Russians and others withdraw. Present policy does nothing to deter.
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    If rebels develop such a retaliatory policy, what can Russia, Iran and others do about it other than what they are already doing–inflicting mass terror therefore deserving the same and no sympathy. Any major increase in Russian-Assad-Khamenei-Nasrallah terrorism will not escape notice among Sunnis elesewhewe and with radicalize Sunnis worldwide. The latter need to realize that Russia and Iran are their number one enemies. When will it sink in? Given the above strategy, it could happen more quickly.
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    Russia and the Islamic Republic of Iran and the economies of both must be destroyed if the world is to have peace.

      • Rebels aren’t bombing Turkey. ISIS is and the regime created ISIS as a useful tool before it turned on Assad. Even then ISIS and the regime often helped each other against the rebels. I
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        Meanwhile I’m confident rebels will figure out the above need. Nice-style attacks in Russia would be very effective because they are so hard to predict, so hard to stop and highly dramatic. I should think pipelines and bridges would be highly vulnerable.
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        Rebels could then say, “Where is the protection Putin promised you. This is payback for his crusade against Sunnis in Syria, Chechnya and elsewhere. Don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time.”

  2. Final phases in the taking of Al Bab. Urban battles ongoing. This will be the toughest part untill now. Once Al Bab falls in FSA hands then there is potential for some very interesting future outcomes.

  3. Palmyra was temporarily given back to Isis for the. purpose of resupplying them with weapons, just like the turnover in Mosul.

    • Yeah, like rebels in Aleppo gave the eastern part of the city to Assad to force their regional backers to ramp up supp-
      ­­
      Wait a sec.

  4. A message to the French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault (“…There is Russian doublespeak (…) On the one hand, they say let’s negotiate … on the other, they continue the war, a total war”) …
    This is how you win wars, you moron, you defeatist idiot.

    • Just the other day the rebels killed a rising Russkie officer who had also taken part in Russia’s war crimes against Ukraine. Good for them. Hopefully the Russians brought along their own body bags.

  5. “”Ayrault continued by challenging Russia’s pretext for its military operations: “The Russians who pretend to fight against terrorism are in fact focusing on Aleppo and have given space to Daesh [the Islamic State], which is in the process of taking back Palmyra, which is very symbolic.””

    On this part i think even those using 1/1000 of their brain can surely conceed. Pure truth.

    • This applies only to those idiots who make a distinction between “rebels” and IS. Islamists are Islamists are Islamists.
      Secondly, and military amateur will tell you that you don’t send your forces deeper into enemy territory when your rear and flanks aren’t secured.

      • “This applies only to those idiots who make a distinction between “rebels” and IS. Islamists are Islamists are Islamists.”

        If there is no distinction between “rebels” and IS then why are they fighting to death between themselves?. The fact that from your stand point you are blind to those distinctions doesn´t mean that they don´t exist.

        • I think the point has to be that, from the Syrian government perspective, although IS & FSA are at also war with each other, they are effectively the same in fighting to destroy the Ba’athist establishment. If anything, the NATO-backed JI-Joes were always the much greater danger to it, which explains why SAA & its allies logically concentrate on neutralising them first.

          • “Because this is their violent nature”

            That´s not an explanatory principle at all, again: only shows your ignorance of the internal differences and political nuances of the several islamist movements. Two things that are equal under every aspect are by definition the same thing and that´s not the case of any islamist movement.

              • Notwithstanding that, some of them (like hezbollah) are figthing for the Assad´s regime, wich again proves that yours is not an explanatory principle at all.

            • Notwithstanding that, some of them (like hezbollah) are figthing for the Assad´s regime, wich again proves that yours is not an explanatory principle at all.

              Actually it is. Hezbollah are not trying to create a caliphate and subjugate the Syrian population. Their involvement is purely motivated by security concerns for Lebanon.

        • If there is no distinction between “rebels” and IS then why are they fighting to death between themselves?.

          Have you never heard of gangland wars between competing gangs. Both gangs are criminal enterprise that make money through drugs, extortion, etc, but that does not mean they see eye to eye.

      • LOL. Because Hezbollah and the Iranian puppet militias from Iraq and elsewhere aren’t islamist at all. Good grief. Give it a rest.

    • “”Ayrault continued by challenging Russia’s pretext for its military operations: “The Russians who pretend to fight against terrorism are in fact focusing on Aleppo and have given space to Daesh [the Islamic State], which is in the process of taking back Palmyra, which is very symbolic.””

      Al Nusra is designated a terrorist group by the US and UN. Al Nusra is in Aleppo, therefore focusing on Aleppo is perfectly consistent with fighting terrorism.

      Yes, this gave space to Dash in Palmyra, but then again, the US gave space to Daesh in Mosul.

      • ” the US gave space to Daesh in Mosul.”
        .
        I can’t think of any way in which that is even remotely true. You could allocate some blame to Maliki, whose vengeful policy toward Sunnis led to the alliance of Islamists with Saddam loyalists that makes up IS in Iraq. You could blame Qutb.
        .
        Or is your complaint that the Americans left Iraq too soon ?

  6. SAA-embedded reporter’s somewhat biased ’interview’ with captured AAS in Al Fardous today:
    https://twitter.com/MmaGreen/status/808330075112427521
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    Reportedly most FSA have surrendered already for the chance to survive performing compulsory military service in Bashar’s Army, with only AAS & JFS as the last hold-outs.
    .
    Grinding them down should not take too long now … and, knowing there will be no escape to the Badlands of Idlib or Tayyip’s Nusra Nature Reserve, an intrepid reporter on the other side delivers his final farewells:
    https://twitter.com/BilalKareem/status/808354660469850112

    • Final farewells from someone who has tasted both coalition and axis forces assassination attempts. The system doesn´t tolerate any independent political adventurer.

  7. #Latakia: “Reports Russian airstrikes targeted Assad/pro-Assad fighters on Syriatel hill in Jabal Akrad with incendiary munitions by mistake. #Latakia” – Paradoxy13
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    Hugging the enemy militarily and fighting mobile guerilla warfare can cause about such incidents.
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    #Hama: “NDF forces from Salamiyah reportedly deploying to reinforce regime positions in Palmyra” – JohnArterbury
    .
    Salamiyah is asking to be over-run by rebels, Hama province is emptying itself of fighters, so why aren’t rebels launching more offensives in the area? They don’t need to capture an area they just need to over-run it and booby-trap buildings as well as planting land-mines and concealed sleeper-cells all of this would be enough to severely damage regime presence in such areas.
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    #Aleppo: “pro-Regime forces took over several districts, forcing Rebels to withdraw to W. side of Queiq river.” – QalaatAlMudiq
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    Rebels outside Aleppo city have a limited amount of time to re-activate Southern Aleppo front in order to capture Jabal Azaan and isolate Haider (as well as to buy some little, even if it’s small, time for eastern Aleppo) but in order to do this rebels will have to attempt to by-pass (using the mobile warfare approach I’ve mentioned in the below link) the regime-built concrete walls north of Abtin and east of Sabiqiyah and have instead quickly moved down south to Al-Jumaymah whilst rebels from Al-Eis tie down regime fighters in in Al-Haider after Shuqaydillah has been secured) would panic the regime into diverting some troops away from eastern Aleppo. If rebels secure the important parts of southern Aleppo before eastern Aleppo falls then rebels will have the regime (see my link below to see the reasons why I’ve stated this – it’s the fifth post from the bottom) surrounded all four sides of Aleppo city.
    .
    http://eaworldview.com/2016/12/syria-daily-turkey-rebels-threaten-isis-while-isis-threatens-regime/
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    Rebels should learn from how Palmyra fell, they should not only adopt a form of mobile warfare that by-passes strong-points like Abtin but like in Palmyra rebels should use pre-emptive diversionary offensives around an area/strong-hold they wish to capture so as to encircle. Furthermore like in Palmyra if a regime stronghold can’t be isolated quickly then attempts should be made using bribery as well as infiltration.

  8. #Observation: As I’ve said yesterday south-east Aleppo and eastern Hama are all flat featureless desert terrain, ideal for mobile operations and might I add mobile warfare is far less labour-intensive then say having a unit digging a trench around an area so as to permanently hold whilst being attacked from the air by Russian jets. To fight mobile warfare in desert just requires having a presence (ie having concealed men/fire-power in an area that can be quickly mobilised/organised into launching a successful ambush in that area) in that area. To facilitate this mobile warfare approach rebels will have to adopt this approach – one that is mobile (ie not fixed in one area but can be quickly moves from one theatre to another – this would require all light artillery to be mounted on vehicles, all mortar and light-machine gun units be given their own transport, giving all assault troops into a motorbikes, giving all battalion units 4/5 BMPs, mounting TOWies on dune-buggies) multiple small-units (battalion – 350+ men that each have their own ammo and fuel wagons that will supply them for 3 weeks then after which they must seize their own from the regime) that only fight short (ie no more then 48 hours) sharp (ie uses it’s ammo and men in a very focused/concentrated way to reach a very specific objective – this could be a check-point or building) raids on enemy positions that can be quickly isolated or infiltrated (or better still both) on multiple fronts. The success of this approach relies on stealth (which rebels can acquire through night-offensives and greater use of camouflage), speed (not only because their units have fewer logistical needs, due to their smaller size, so can mobilise quicker but also because their units, including the light artillery units, are mounted rebel can move from one area without being slowed down) and shock (so as long reconnaissance and infiltration of regime positions – including bribing junior regime officers – is done properly rebel’s would be able to attack unexpectedly all the time). I point this out because it may help assist the below aspiration (see link) of the twitter poster Interbrigades.
    .
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Czfj1KvXAAEhixa.jpg
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    Raid this corridor as outlined above (by this poster) but also combine it with the surprise capture of Jabal Azaan (as well as Haider) and it may open up the possibility of making a push for Mount Nabi Idris which in turn can become a base to raid the outskirts of Safira and Nayrab airbase simultaneously. I’d like to mention (no slight on his part) that Interbrigades forgets to mentions that the area south of Al-Jurrayn and north of Abu Jalbus is mountainous (google-earth it) and east of Abu Jalbus and the Euphrates is a narrow flat land. In this area rebels don’t need to create and keep a trench to hold a territory they just need meaningful presence (ie where they can quickly mobilised concealed troops/fire-power to launch an ambush) in the area. Look at it, if played cleverly rebels can turn into a giant killing-field (e.g. the mountains to the south of Al-Safira around Abu Jalbus would be an ideal artillery/TOWie/Mortar shelling sighting point, the narrow flat land between Abu Jalbus and the Euphrates an IED/land-mine trap) but the regime won’t enter this imagined killing field if rebels don’t capture/secure Jabal Azaan/Arbaeen first.
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    Finally I’ll say this – in nature predators capture prey hiding in safe zones by unexpectedly panicking them (ie through speed and shock) so as to move their prey towards an inescapable trap (and keep shocking/panicking their prey till they fall into their trap) before destroying their prey outright. I suspect if rebels were to ever implement the strategy in the above it’d panic the regime enough to send a large army south of Safira in order to secure it and when it does so the ‘killing field’ ploy I’ve outlined make come into play. Two days ago I mentioned that the most successful armies that fought in the pre-gunpowder middle east were mobile cavalry armies. That such armies use to out-manoeuvre and destroy their less mobile opponents (e.g. heavy infantry of the Roman legions vs Parthians – see first link, heavy infantry crusader army vs Turkmen-Arab light cavalry army of Saladin – see second link) by luring out them out to areas where they can be quickly isolated/de-mobilised (ie an inescapable trap) and then worn down through mobile hit-and-run attritional attacks. Whose to say rebel’s can do something similar with the above strategy if they combined the capture of Jabal Azaan with the raiding strategy around Khanassir as outlined by Interbrigade?
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    https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSLOyZBktOVGvYtvdPKvVEKk_vrMkS059byJs4pnhO_3PQ5Yr2O
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    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_rFs0uVY_4rE/TD_wf2bxQ-I/AAAAAAAAIG4/-ybzV16uyuQ/s1600/Map+–+battle+of+Hattin.jpg

      • Initially I had this battle in mind: The battle of Carrhae –
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        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKojtyjPKWM
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        Apologies for the naff computer games graphics it uses, it’s not really a documentary, but an interesting little programme I use to watch in my younger days.
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        In featureless desert/flat terrain the mobile army that can isolate and attack an enemy more quicker then them often always win.

        • One of the advantages of fighting a mobile guerrilla approach is that it allows/enable you to have a forward defence (ie pre-emptively destroying/obstructing a regime offensive before it gains momentum – e.g. attacking and destroying a regime assembly area before regime troops before they are prepared) policy and in doing so it takes fighting away from rebel areas and brings it to regime areas, and because a forward policy through mobile warfare takes the fight to regime areas it gives the attack the initiative to pick where and when they’ll fight their enemy. Imagine for instance if rebels had adopted a mobile approach to the YPG during the Tel Rifaat incident by sending fast mobile units inside Afrin, at a stroke it’d force the YPG to quit Tel Rifaat to secure Afrin and thereby give rebel troops there time to fortify their positions before the YPG returns again.

  9. i don’t view the fall of east Aleppo as a turning point. Yes, it’s a hard defeat for the rebels, but 1) the rebels will actually control more Syrian territory after the fall of Aleppo than they controlled at the start of the siege in the middle of this year, 2) the bombed out neighborhoods of east Aleppo themselves have no strategic value, and 3) the loss of east Aleppo will provide the rebels with a valuable reminder that they are insurgents and should be waging a war of insurgency. In regard to this last point, the rebels should not be going toe to toe with vast concentrations of enemy forces from 5 different nations. insurgents ought to hit their enemies where they are weakest, not strongest. They should have moved out of Aleppo just as soon as it became clear that the regime was deploying the greatest concentration of military force in the entire war. Hopefully, they will now fight more like Sun Tzu and Mao and less like Friedrich Paulus.

    • i don’t view the fall of east Aleppo as a turning point.

      Of course not, not that it has fallen to the regime. Had it fallen to the rebels, then it would have been.

      1) the rebels will actually control more Syrian territory after the fall of Aleppo than they controlled at the start of the siege in the middle of this year,

      Yeah, all those big chunks of desert that cannot sustain life. What a great achievement!

      2) the bombed out neighborhoods of east Aleppo themselves have no strategic value

      That would explain why the rebels gave up thousands of fighters to defend it.

      3) the loss of east Aleppo will provide the rebels with a valuable reminder that they are insurgents and should be waging a war of insurgency.

      Insurgency is pointless unless it’s a means to an end. If you don’t end up controlling territory, it’s futile.

      • “Had it fallen to the rebels, then it would have been.”
        – Quite possibly. The two sides are not similarly situated and their progress cannot be judged by the same metrics.

        “1) the rebels will actually control more Syrian territory after the fall of Aleppo than they controlled at the start of the siege in the middle of this year,
        Yeah, all those big chunks of desert that cannot sustain life. What a great achievement!””:
        — More like hundreds of square miles in northern Syria, including towns and villages and a small city.

        “2) the bombed out neighborhoods of east Aleppo themselves have no strategic value
        That would explain why the rebels gave up thousands of fighters to defend it.”

        — No, an undue emphasis on symbolism and an inflexibility in tactics in the face of a change in battlefield conditions explains their choices.

        “3) the loss of east Aleppo will provide the rebels with a valuable reminder that they are insurgents and should be waging a war of insurgency.
        Insurgency is pointless unless it’s a means to an end. If you don’t end up controlling territory, it’s futile.”

        –You don’t understand insurgency doctrine or linear time. Bless your heart.

  10. This conflict isn’t near any conclusion anytime doon in my opinion. The foreign shia troops will only inflame the passive sunni demographic. One of my Iraqi students always referred to US/allied forces as “foreigners”. No one likes strangers with guns in their street.

  11. To the rebels and the rebel-supporting civilians: You have only two duties now – vengeance, self-sufficiency and a strategy that’s more flexible as well as cost-efficient. You can’t get first without the last three.

    • Do you see any need for an adjustment in the FSA’s failed political strategy of totally subjugating themselves to habitual warcriminal Yankistan and its loathsome HouseArab tawagheet, plus Tayyip-the-serial-backstabber?

  12. NEWSFLASH: The Jonkharrie will meet Lavrov on Friday for continued talks on evacuating his JI-Joe Hirelings from E.Aleppo to Idlib, whence they can carry on moderately killing Syrian government forces in the comfort and impunity to which they have become accustomed …
    .
    #Exceptional_Brain-Bugs_being_exceptional[ly_stupid].

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